Saturday, January 9, 2021

How to Fix Dented Doll Nose

 (good grief it's been ages.)


How To Fix A Dinged Nose

1. remove eyes, store safely somewhere, don't need those falling out.
2. Cover faceup and head with plastic wrap, ripping the smallest possible jagged hole to expose where the nose damage is. Do this with about three layers of the stuff, the idea is to get a jagged edged hole around the damage.
3. Put on oven mitt. Put the kettle on. As the steam whooshes out when the kettle boils, poke the injured nose into the steam at least two or three inches from the spout. Hold it there for five seconds, remove to check to see if resin has popped back to shape, repeat as needed or until you're not getting any more result.

That's the dings and dents solved. As for the blushing of the nose.
PART two!

1. Remove plastic wrap. Replace with a paper towel, and again tear to expose the nose. This masks off the rest of the face but leaves a soft edge around the nose.
2. Get a melamine sponge, of the mister clean or other type brand. Now what you do with that is DO NOT wet it, but using it dry, treat it like it's a sanding block and gently sand away the damaged blushing, going lighter at the edges of the damaged area. This prevents any sharp edges between blushed and non blushed areas. You'll see as you go that you can "erase" the color in the damaged spot and create a soft airbrushy edge or fading of color from that spot, if that makes sense.
3. Wearing proper respiration protection and under proper conditions, this is when you hit the almost-totally-covered face with a puff of sealant. Our ragged hole paper towel masking technique is what lets this work.
4. Mix a color match for the other blushing visible around the nose, as carefully as you can, using quality pastels. Then blush back the color onto the now sealed nose with a very fine soft brush. Using the best brush you can really makes a difference here for layering on very tiny amounts of color at a time so as to get a smooth match.
5. Seal again, remove the paper towel, admire the flawless repair, and never trust a dolly not to nosedive.
How To Fix A Dinged Nose

1. remove eyes, store safely somewhere, don't need those falling out.
2. Cover faceup and head with plastic wrap, ripping the smallest possible jagged hole to expose where the nose damage is. Do this with about three layers of the stuff, the idea is to get a jagged edged hole around the damage.
3. Put on oven mitt. Put the kettle on. As the steam whooshes out when the kettle boils, poke the injured nose into the steam at least two or three inches from the spout. Hold it there for five seconds, remove to check to see if resin has popped back to shape, repeat as needed or until you're not getting any more result.

That's the dings and dents solved. As for the blushing of the nose.
PART two!

1. Remove plastic wrap. Replace with a paper towel, and again tear to expose the nose. This masks off the rest of the face but leaves a soft edge around the nose.
2. Get a melamine sponge, of the mister clean or other type brand. Now what you do with that is DO NOT wet it, but using it dry, treat it like it's a sanding block and gently sand away the damaged blushing, going lighter at the edges of the damaged area. This prevents any sharp edges between blushed and non blushed areas. You'll see as you go that you can "erase" the color in the damaged spot and create a soft airbrushy edge or fading of color from that spot, if that makes sense.
3. Wearing proper respiration protection and under proper conditions, this is when you hit the almost-totally-covered face with a puff of sealant. Our ragged hole paper towel masking technique is what lets this work.
4. Mix a color match for the other blushing visible around the nose, as carefully as you can, using quality pastels. Then blush back the color onto the now sealed nose with a very fine soft brush. Using the best brush you can really makes a difference here for layering on very tiny amounts of color at a time so as to get a smooth match.
5. Seal again, remove the paper towel, admire the flawless repair, and never trust a dolly not to nosedive.

 How To Fix A Dented Dolly Nose

1. remove eyes, store safely somewhere, don't need those falling out.
2. Cover faceup and head with plastic wrap, ripping the smallest possible jagged hole to expose where the nose damage is. Do this with about three layers of the stuff, the idea is to get a jagged edged hole around the damage.
3. Put on oven mitt. Put the kettle on. As the steam whooshes out when the kettle boils, poke the injured nose into the steam at least two or three inches from the spout. Hold it there for five seconds, remove to check to see if resin has popped back to shape, repeat as needed or until you're not getting any more result.

That's the dings and dents solved. As for the blushing of the nose.
PART two! This can be used to spot-fix any part of a faceup. It's not always guaranteed to work, and depends on your skill as well as dumb luck, YMMV but it's always worth a shot.


1. Remove plastic wrap. Replace with a paper towel, and again tear to expose the nose. This masks off the rest of the face but leaves a soft edge around the nose.
2. Get a melamine sponge, of the mister clean or other type brand. Now what you do with that is DO NOT wet it, but using it dry, treat it like it's a sanding block and gently sand away the damaged blushing, going lighter at the edges of the damaged area. This prevents any sharp edges between blushed and non blushed areas. You'll see as you go that you can "erase" the color in the damaged spot and create a soft airbrushy edge or fading of color from that spot, if that makes sense.
3. Wearing proper respiration protection and under proper conditions, this is when you hit the almost-totally-covered face with a puff of sealant. Our ragged hole paper towel masking technique is what lets this work.
4. Mix a color match for the other blushing visible around the nose, as carefully as you can, using quality pastels. Then blush back the color onto the now sealed nose with a very fine soft brush. Using the best brush you can really makes a difference here for layering on very tiny amounts of color at a time so as to get a smooth match.
5. Seal again, remove the paper towel, stick the eyes back in now, admire the flawless repair, and never trust a dolly not to nosedive.

 
How To Fix A Dinged Nose

1. remove eyes, store safely somewhere, don't need those falling out.
2. Cover faceup and head with plastic wrap, ripping the smallest possible jagged hole to expose where the nose damage is. Do this with about three layers of the stuff, the idea is to get a jagged edged hole around the damage.
3. Put on oven mitt. Put the kettle on. As the steam whooshes out when the kettle boils, poke the injured nose into the steam at least two or three inches from the spout. Hold it there for five seconds, remove to check to see if resin has popped back to shape, repeat as needed or until you're not getting any more result.

That's the dings and dents solved. As for the blushing of the nose.
PART two!

1. Remove plastic wrap. Replace with a paper towel, and again tear to expose the nose. This masks off the rest of the face but leaves a soft edge around the nose.
2. Get a melamine sponge, of the mister clean or other type brand. Now what you do with that is DO NOT wet it, but using it dry, treat it like it's a sanding block and gently sand away the damaged blushing, going lighter at the edges of the damaged area. This prevents any sharp edges between blushed and non blushed areas. You'll see as you go that you can "erase" the color in the damaged spot and create a soft airbrushy edge or fading of color from that spot, if that makes sense.
3. Wearing proper respiration protection and under proper conditions, this is when you hit the almost-totally-covered face with a puff of sealant. Our ragged hole paper towel masking technique is what lets this work.
4. Mix a color match for the other blushing visible around the nose, as carefully as you can, using quality pastels. Then blush back the color onto the now sealed nose with a very fine soft brush. Using the best brush you can really makes a difference here for layering on very tiny amounts of color at a time so as to get a smooth match.
5. Seal again, remove the paper towel, admire the flawless repair, and never trust a dolly not to nosedive.
How To Fix A Dinged Nose

1. remove eyes, store safely somewhere, don't need those falling out.
2. Cover faceup and head with plastic wrap, ripping the smallest possible jagged hole to expose where the nose damage is. Do this with about three layers of the stuff, the idea is to get a jagged edged hole around the damage.
3. Put on oven mitt. Put the kettle on. As the steam whooshes out when the kettle boils, poke the injured nose into the steam at least two or three inches from the spout. Hold it there for five seconds, remove to check to see if resin has popped back to shape, repeat as needed or until you're not getting any more result.

That's the dings and dents solved. As for the blushing of the nose.
PART two!

1. Remove plastic wrap. Replace with a paper towel, and again tear to expose the nose. This masks off the rest of the face but leaves a soft edge around the nose.
2. Get a melamine sponge, of the mister clean or other type brand. Now what you do with that is DO NOT wet it, but using it dry, treat it like it's a sanding block and gently sand away the damaged blushing, going lighter at the edges of the damaged area. This prevents any sharp edges between blushed and non blushed areas. You'll see as you go that you can "erase" the color in the damaged spot and create a soft airbrushy edge or fading of color from that spot, if that makes sense.
3. Wearing proper respiration protection and under proper conditions, this is when you hit the almost-totally-covered face with a puff of sealant. Our ragged hole paper towel masking technique is what lets this work.
4. Mix a color match for the other blushing visible around the nose, as carefully as you can, using quality pastels. Then blush back the color onto the now sealed nose with a very fine soft brush. Using the best brush you can really makes a difference here for layering on very tiny amounts of color at a time so as to get a smooth match.
5. Seal again, remove the paper towel, admire the flawless repair, and never trust a dolly not to nosedive.

How To Fix A Dinged Nose

1. remove eyes, store safely somewhere, don't need those falling out.
2. Cover faceup and head with plastic wrap, ripping the smallest possible jagged hole to expose where the nose damage is. Do this with about three layers of the stuff, the idea is to get a jagged edged hole around the damage.
3. Put on oven mitt. Put the kettle on. As the steam whooshes out when the kettle boils, poke the injured nose into the steam at least two or three inches from the spout. Hold it there for five seconds, remove to check to see if resin has popped back to shape, repeat as needed or until you're not getting any more result.

That's the dings and dents solved. As for the blushing of the nose.
PART two!

1. Remove plastic wrap. Replace with a paper towel, and again tear to expose the nose. This masks off the rest of the face but leaves a soft edge around the nose.
2. Get a melamine sponge, of the mister clean or other type brand. Now what you do with that is DO NOT wet it, but using it dry, treat it like it's a sanding block and gently sand away the damaged blushing, going lighter at the edges of the damaged area. This prevents any sharp edges between blushed and non blushed areas. You'll see as you go that you can "erase" the color in the damaged spot and create a soft airbrushy edge or fading of color from that spot, if that makes sense.
3. Wearing proper respiration protection and under proper conditions, this is when you hit the almost-totally-covered face with a puff of sealant. Our ragged hole paper towel masking technique is what lets this work.
4. Mix a color match for the other blushing visible around the nose, as carefully as you can, using quality pastels. Then blush back the color onto the now sealed nose with a very fine soft brush. Using the best brush you can really makes a difference here for layering on very tiny amounts of color at a time so as to get a smooth match.
5. Seal again, remove the paper towel, admire the flawless repair, and never trust a dolly not to nosedive.

How To Fix A Dinged Nose

1. remove eyes, store safely somewhere, don't need those falling out.
2. Cover faceup and head with plastic wrap, ripping the smallest possible jagged hole to expose where the nose damage is. Do this with about three layers of the stuff, the idea is to get a jagged edged hole around the damage.
3. Put on oven mitt. Put the kettle on. As the steam whooshes out when the kettle boils, poke the injured nose into the steam at least two or three inches from the spout. Hold it there for five seconds, remove to check to see if resin has popped back to shape, repeat as needed or until you're not getting any more result.

That's the dings and dents solved. As for the blushing of the nose.
PART two!

1. Remove plastic wrap. Replace with a paper towel, and again tear to expose the nose. This masks off the rest of the face but leaves a soft edge around the nose.
2. Get a melamine sponge, of the mister clean or other type brand. Now what you do with that is DO NOT wet it, but using it dry, treat it like it's a sanding block and gently sand away the damaged blushing, going lighter at the edges of the damaged area. This prevents any sharp edges between blushed and non blushed areas. You'll see as you go that you can "erase" the color in the damaged spot and create a soft airbrushy edge or fading of color from that spot, if that makes sense.
3. Wearing proper respiration protection and under proper conditions, this is when you hit the almost-totally-covered face with a puff of sealant. Our ragged hole paper towel masking technique is what lets this work.
4. Mix a color match for the other blushing visible around the nose, as carefully as you can, using quality pastels. Then blush back the color onto the now sealed nose with a very fine soft brush. Using the best brush you can really makes a difference here for layering on very tiny amounts of color at a time so as to get a smooth match.
5. Seal again, remove the paper towel, admire the flawless repair, and never trust a dolly not to nosedive.

How To Fix A Dinged Nose

1. remove eyes, store safely somewhere, don't need those falling out.
2. Cover faceup and head with plastic wrap, ripping the smallest possible jagged hole to expose where the nose damage is. Do this with about three layers of the stuff, the idea is to get a jagged edged hole around the damage.
3. Put on oven mitt. Put the kettle on. As the steam whooshes out when the kettle boils, poke the injured nose into the steam at least two or three inches from the spout. Hold it there for five seconds, remove to check to see if resin has popped back to shape, repeat as needed or until you're not getting any more result.

That's the dings and dents solved. As for the blushing of the nose.
PART two!

1. Remove plastic wrap. Replace with a paper towel, and again tear to expose the nose. This masks off the rest of the face but leaves a soft edge around the nose.
2. Get a melamine sponge, of the mister clean or other type brand. Now what you do with that is DO NOT wet it, but using it dry, treat it like it's a sanding block and gently sand away the damaged blushing, going lighter at the edges of the damaged area. This prevents any sharp edges between blushed and non blushed areas. You'll see as you go that you can "erase" the color in the damaged spot and create a soft airbrushy edge or fading of color from that spot, if that makes sense.
3. Wearing proper respiration protection and under proper conditions, this is when you hit the almost-totally-covered face with a puff of sealant. Our ragged hole paper towel masking technique is what lets this work.
4. Mix a color match for the other blushing visible around the nose, as carefully as you can, using quality pastels. Then blush back the color onto the now sealed nose with a very fine soft brush. Using the best brush you can really makes a difference here for layering on very tiny amounts of color at a time so as to get a smooth match.
5. Seal again, remove the paper towel, admire the flawless repair, and never trust a dolly not to nosedive.

Saturday, December 22, 2018

1/6 world

I've been sucked down the 1/6 rabbithole.
 Luckily I think I am satisfied with my number of character/dolls, so they are now gonna just be an excuse for dioramas and modeling. Rather like my two Azone 1/12 plastic dollies. The 1/6 crew are from the Star Wars galaxy far far away. 

One is a younger version of Kelseph, a former rpg character of mine; one is a Jedi mystic, special Seed Dolls handcast head; and one is this girl I got so there'd be a non-Jedi humanoid in the bunch and she's quickly gaining personality. They've also got a MissMonster HUND as their trusty Droid pal.

This is our Jedi mystic, an alien male who is a very calm sort of person. Sometimes aggravatingly so.

Thursday, September 6, 2018

A few of the Least-Expensive Legit BJDs Rosslyn Could Find

So we know this hobby is expensive. 

It's tough to want a beautiful doll and not be able to afford it.

 We don't want to buy stolen goods so a recast is right out.

Which are the completely least expensive but still beautiful resin ball jointed dolls?
Here's a few lovelies I have hunted up.

Even the famous Fairyland has Littlefees in Boy and Girl versions (the best posers, and YoSD being the most "fun" doll size in the hobby IMHO, so portable) which can run you under $300 and they're absolutely fantastic. If you made me choose one doll to keep out of my collection... I'd hate to pick but let's be honest, it'd be Stella, my Littlefee.

They also sell Pukifees, 18cm little pocket pals in that same choice A La Carte system. Someday we hope they will bring back Pukipukis, which used to go for around $180 each and were great little travel buddies. Mine has a little case I can slip into my purse, and she's been on trips with me like a little travel gnome. 

Fairyland offers their Tan Skin kind of periodically for different size categories, so if you're really set on it, don't fret! They often offer it for Events at Winter holidays, Spring festival, or Halloween. You can buy through dealer Denver Doll Emporium if you're in the USA and don't want to deal with the company, but Fairyland has always been professional with me.

If you like fantasy fairy type dolls, Charm Doll has a cute little succulent plant fairy for $140.


If you like little animal dolls, DollFamily A makes a whole handful of little critters for $100-$120 each, and many other cute dolls besides. Cocotribe's animals are about $135.
Impldoll makes a colorful lil' crocodile at  $145 that would be easy to add horns and wings to for a dragon.

Bobobie has several beautiful tiny dolls for under $100, and you can get them through Denver Doll Emporium or the company's own website.

Doll Leaves sells a lot of lovely tiny dolls for $88!!- $135

They've also got several gorgeous Yo-SD sized (about 12 inches tall) dolls for $160.
Only Doll makes some for $110.

Dollzone has many dolls in the middle size and smaller who cost under $300, down to $175

Dikadoll mid size Kids come with lots of face types including smiling or anime style faces!

Gem of Doll has Yo-SD sized dolls and Tiny sized dolls.

Impldoll has many little fae and fairy style YoSD sized dolls at $145. Their MSDs or 1/4 sized dolls are only $188-$208. They even make 1/3 sized dolls or SD size for less than $300!

Myou Doll has some really gorgeous faces on dolls in many sizes that come in a nice price range.

Asleep Eidolon does really high quality craftsmanship on their stunning dolls, and the mid size or anything smaller are often under $300. Beautiful faces too.

Angel of Dream makes 1/4 or MSD dolls for $165, and a lot of SD or 1/3 size dolls for under $300!

Some of Doll Chateau's etherial waifs go for less than $300

If you're into Chinese fantasy and more mature dolls, Granado's 30cm lads are marvelous little versions of their well known male dolls. 

Resinsoul has so many options and almost all of them are under $300! One of my prettiest dolls is a Resinsoul hybrid. Mature 1/3 SD size men, a Tiefling looking gal you can order in many resin colors, and a lady who can be your Blood or Night Elf from WoW, with a color you choose. THey have satyrs, centaurs, draconic MSDs, and elves galore. They've even been known to swap  heads and bodies for your custom choice, or do clear resin for some parts on request.

And that's just a sampling!

Friday, August 3, 2018

I want to make Food and Props for my Doll!

Polymer clay can have a translucency to it that mimics food really well, and there are some special tricks you can do to get very realistic food. 

I'd recommend youtube Miniatures tutorials by SugarCharmShop, as she does very clear simple tutorials with great results. Her stuff is dollhouse sized but if you do the same things slightly larger you can make treats and accessories for any size of doll.

Here's a link but it autoplays a video with sound so be aware of that.

(She also repaints vinyl dolls and does doll clothing tutorials you can probably use for your BJD.)

Here's her video of polymer clay basics. Here's one for her tools she uses

Here's a second channel where she had a lot of the food videos and they're still there. Sound!



She's just a fantastic resource for anyone who loves dolls.

Sunday, September 3, 2017

New duds.

Shade, one of the Art Doll Crew, has finally gotten clothes to suit him. He's a bit of a clothes-horse or fashionista so he requires glamorous or interesting outfits. These were made by Nezumitoo on Etsy.



These are just phone pics, so they're not very good, but at least I now have a skylight in my hallway to add some natural light I can shoot quick snaps in.  (it used to be the shaft for a swamp cooler but I got central air so my Dad built it into a skylight for me)

Fayeth, one of my MSDs, also got into the Nezumitoo order and has appropriated this coat for herself even though it's SD sized.



Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Making Aspen the Dryad, part 2

This is a kind of post-dated post. A lot's been happening in my life and I've gone Pro as an artist so things have been rather hectic for 2017! But I did finish Aspen and she's such fun to play with!
Here's how it went.

After my thumb healed I was able to finally do her blushing. I went for a very simple and dramatic faceup, with greys and browns. He skin has been painted and blushed, with those little marks on it that birches and aspens get. I made those dimensional by using a little grainy acrylic texturing gel.




Then it was just a question of popping her wig on... and she was done! She's a ton of fun to photograph and her body takes some getting used to in the posing department but I love her expression.

I probably won't bother making clothes for her. Trees don't wear clothes! With Autumn coming up, I will need to finish her other wig- the golden Aspen in full glory!

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Native Pair Project

Okay so I bought new dolls... but they're not for me! Not really anyway. I may end up long-term loaning them as an exhibit to our tribal culture museum.

This is a project I've meant to do for a long time but I've put off because I couldn't find anything realistic enough at a nice price and a small size. I've put down money on an AncientTales pair of male and female 1/6 scale mature dolls. I am going to modify and use them for diorama photos of my native tribe's history.

I am very excited to finally do this, later this year. I can make photos into illustrations for books if they're good enough.